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Goodbye Princess. Goodbye Carrie

This is not a review. This is not even an article. This is a love letter to a woman that taught us all to be defiant. To not conform with what society asks of you. To be open and honest about our problems. And to always do it with a smile and a joke. To be positive, even in the face of tragedy. This is a love letter to Carrie Fisher; the princess, the icon, and the woman underneath it all.


Carrie Fisher, to me, and to most of us, was more than just an actress. Even more than just a character. She was the embodiment of strength, determination and honesty. So much honesty. She never recoiled from saying whatever she was feeling at the time. She never backed down from defending what she believed in. If she felt something needed to be said, she would say it. She kept no facade. No "character" mask. She showed herself to the world in her integrity; the good, the bad and whatever fell in the middle.

That was her mantra: truth came first. For good and for worse. And that's what made her even more special; she also was outspoken about her own problems and weaknesses. Which is something that helped so many of us to understand that it was okay to have flaws. That there was no need to be perfect. That there's beauty in imperfection as well.

Her long struggle with bipolarity and her passionate campaign for normalizing mental illness helped people around the globe; helping to dissipate the misconceptions and prejudices around mental illnesses (true, there's still a lot of work needed on that front, but she never shied away from the task).

Her wit, intelligence and charm made us fall in love with her. But it was her honesty and fierce independence which sustained that love for such a long time, and what will make her endure as an icon and as a woman.

Carrie Fisher taught me that being a princess is something more than looking pretty and being rescued. That being a princess was also about responsibility, intelligence, courage and leadership. She taught me that princesses can save galaxies as well. And most importantly, that you don't need to be a princess to do all that.


This past 27th of December, as I waited in line to see Rogue One for the second time, my Facebook feed found itself flooded with dreadful news: Carrie Fisher had passed away. It came like a heavy hit in the chest. Later, as the movie came to a close, I found myself tearing up. And it was with a heavy heart that I forced myself to accept that this was really happening. Our Princess was gone. She had become One with the Force.

This, as meaningless as it might seem, is my final farewell to a woman that taught me so much without even knowing me. My thoughts and prayers will be with her family.

Goodbye Princess. Goodbye Carrie.

Comments

  1. My feelings as well. Beautiful article for a beautiful woman. She will be missed.

    ReplyDelete

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