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The Costume Vault Anniversary!

Good day, beautiful readers!! First of all, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone!


Today is a very special day for us, here at The Costume Vault. It's our anniversary!!! We're celebrating our third anniversary! Though to be honest, we didn't actually start this project seriously until last year... So, we're a three year old, with the experience of a one year old...? Oh, who cares. Today, three years ago, we published our first article ever. So, today is a day of celebration.

This project started out of a deep love for movies and costuming and a need to share that. And also boredom.... we had quite the free time back then, to be honest. But the project took off, and now we continue even when we don't have as much free time. But it's worth it, because we get to share our love for movies and costuming with you.

To this day, we've written sixty articles, most of which we are quite proud indeed. And what's even better, you seem to enjoy reading them as much as we enjoy writing them. Which is the biggest Christmas present we could actually get.

And, to return some of that love we get from you on a daily basis, we decided to give you the chance to decide what will our next review be!


Here are the options:

               1. The Hollow Crown and representing power


               An analysis of the costuming evolution throughout the two seasons of the                show as a way to represent differing views on power and authority.

               2. Movie Icons: Jack Sparrow


               An analysis of the visual cues used to create Jack Sparrow as a staple of                  cinema beyond the movie itself.

               3. Gone with the Wind and the birth of Costume Drama


               An overview of Scarlet's O'Hara mythic costumes by Walter Plunket and                  how they helped define both the character and the genre itself.

You can cast your vote in the comments below, Facebook (here), tumblr (here), or twitter (here), all of which will be open until January 11th. That same day we'll tally and tell you about it! After that, we'll delivered the elected article around the 1st of February,

Thank you so much for supporting this blog and helping us grow all through this past 2016!! Happy New Year!!

Comments

  1. I vote for Gone with the Wind! although Jack Sparrow would also be cool

    ReplyDelete
  2. Congrats for the 1+2 year anniversary! I vote for Gone With the Wind but it was hard to choose between that and Jack Sparrow since I love both films, and even the Pirates sequels.

    ReplyDelete

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